International Translation Agency is Looking for Translators

International Translation Agency is Looking for Translators


International Translation Agency is looking for translators and interpreters to work on constant basis and in separate projects. 

The selected candidates are going to work in a remote mode.

The volume of work is going to be settled individually.

We are looking for translators who are: 

  • Fluent at least in one pair of languages (written and oral translation);
  • Having prior experience of work in the domain of translation.

In your application papers please indicate:

  • Education;
  • Proof of the language fluency;
  • Proof of the experience of doing translations (projects, samples of texts translated, certificates, reference letters);
  • Pair of languages (native-target);
  • Specialisation in translation (technical, medical, written, oral, etc);
  • Current employment status.

If you are interested in perspective collaboration, please forward your papers to start.inforum@gmail.com

L & P Project Goes On

L&P English Project is in progress. We are working at the topic “Home, Sweet Home”. 

In the program there are thematic songs, interactive assignments, creative tasks and other forms of active learning with our international team of the trainers.

No child is left behind, all are interacting regardless of their age and the level of English. All are participating and contributing to the whole group work with their own abilities and talents supported by the trainers in each small group.

We are looking forward to new sessions and activities!

Learning Russian from Zero

Russian Language from Zero is the program aimed to enhance the Russian literacy and Russian culture awareness.

The overall content for the program entails teaching basic Russian through interaction with different experts of the Russian Language.

The learning occurs in the natural settings of communication and interaction. The project ends up with the trip to the premisses of the university with the Russian Language as the education medium for the summing up intensive educational and cultural program.

The tentative content of the program covers the following topics to acquire:

  1. Week – Reading: alphabet, letters (by the end of the class the students are able to read and write down simple words) Speaking: sounds, sound combinations, simple words. Conversation: greetings. Listening:  sounds, sound combinations, simple words. Writing: sounds, sound combinations, simple words.
  1. Week – Reading: alphabet, simple words; Speaking: basic vocabulary, personal pronouns, Topic “Greetings”, plural form of nouns, genders; Listening:  Basic vocabulary, personal pronouns, intonation in statements and questions; Writing: simple words.
  2. Week – Reading: simple words and sentences; Speaking: Basic sentences. Topics: Greetings. Acquaintance. Jobs. Listening:  Basic vocabulary, personal pronouns, intonation in statements and questions; Writing: simple words and sentences – copying and dictating.
  3. Week – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Basic sentences. Topics: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands; Listening:  Basic sentences, commands, short conversations.
  4. Week – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Basic sentences. Topics: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands. Shopping. Question-Answer. Weather. Listening:  Basic sentences, commands, short conversations. Writing: simple words and sentences – copying, dictating, writing on one’s own.
  5. Week – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands. Shopping. Question-Answer. Family. Professions. Numbers; Listening:  Sentences, commands, short conversations and texts; Writing: words and sentences – copying, dictating, writing on one’s own
  6. Week – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands. Shopping. Question-Answer. My family. Professions. Daily routines. Time; Listening:  Sentences, commands, short conversations and texts; Writing: words and sentences – copying, dictating, writing on one’s own.
  7. Week – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands. Shopping. Question-Answer. My family. Professions. Daily routines. My house; Listening:  Sentences, commands, short conversations and texts; Writing: words and sentences – copying, dictating, writing on one’s own.
  8. Week – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands. Shopping. Question-Answer. My family. Professions. Daily routines. My house. My city; Listening:  Sentences, commands, short conversations and texts; Writing: words and sentences – copying, dictating, writing on one’s own.
  9. Week – Summing up – Reading: words, sentences, short texts and conversations; Speaking: Greetings. Acquaintance. Numbers. Basic commands. Shopping. Question-Answer. My family. Professions. Daily routines. My house. My city; Listening:  Sentences, commands, short conversations and texts; Writing: words and sentences – copying, dictating, writing on one’s own.

Education in Turkey

Turkish education system is under the supervision and control of the state, namely the Ministry of National Education. According to the Constitution of the Republic of Turkey, everyone has the right to receive education. Education is compulsory from ages 6 to 14 and free in state schools. The country’s primary schools currently have a 98 percent participation rate. 
The academic year in Turkish education institutions generally begins in the mid-September or early October and continues to May or early June. There is also a two-week winter break in February. 

Stages of the Education System

Pre-School Education: Optional kindergarten education, up to 6 years of age.
Primary Education: Compulsory and free basic education for eight years (5 years elementary + 3 years secondary), 6-14 years of age.
Secondary Education: 4 years of High School (Lise), or Vocational High School education, 15-17/18 years of age. Some schools might have an additional year of language study. High schools are mostly owned by the government and provide free education. 
Higher Education: 4 years of University, or 2 years at Higher Vocational Schools. Some schools have an additional year of language study. Under normal circumstances, Master’s study lasts 2 years; PhD 3-5 years. This category includes all educational institutions which will provide post-secondary education. They are under the supervision of Higher Educational Council (YOK).

Types of High Schools

Public High Schools (“Normal Liseler” or “Duz Liseler”): Any student who successfully completes 8 years of basic education can go onto these schools. Graduates of public high schools, if successful in the nationwide University Entrance Examination (ÖSS), can go onto higher education institutions. Graduates are awarded with the Lise Diploması.
Vocational High Schools (Meslek Liseleri): Some of these schools may take an additional year to complete. Graduates can automatically go on to higher vocational schools (Meslek Yüksek Okulları – 2 Year Vocational Colleges) in their respective fields of study if they wish. Alternatively, if successful in the university entrance examination, they can go onto 4-year schools in their respective fields.
Anatolian High Schools (Anadolu Liseleri): One year of English study followed by 3 years of regular high school education, additional hours for English. Math and Science lessons at these schools are sometimes taught in English. Lessons at some Anatolian high schools are taught in either German or French.
Super High Schools (Super Liseler): The difference between these and normal high schools is one extra year of English study. They differ from Anatolian high schools in that the language of instruction for math and science courses is always Turkish and less hours are given to English lessons.
Science High Schools (Fen Liseleri): These are special public schools for students who have exceptional aptitude in the sciences. These very competitive high schools train students specifically for higher education in the sciences, technical and medical fields. There is also Anatolian Science High Schools (Anadolu Fen Liseleri), where the medium of instruction for math and sciences is sometimes in English.
Private High Schools (Ozel Liseler): Most private high schools charge very high tuition fees and are very competitive.

Types of Higher Education Institutions

State Universities (Devlet Universiteleri): The university system in Turkey is governed by the Higher Educational Council (YOK). Turkey has 104 state and 62 private universities (a total of 166 institutions of higher learning), 5 of which are located in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. Apart from the public and private universities, 8 foundation higher vocational schools serve the job market.

Generally, undergraduate education takes 4 years at universities, but some fields such as medicine (6 years), dentistry (5 years), and veterinary science (5 years) take longer. Turkish high school graduates go directly into fields of study such as medicine, law, dentistry and so on. No tuition fee is charged at public schools (devlet universitesi); students pay only a small basic fee. Students need to pass a nationwide University Entrance Exam (OSS) to enter a university. The graduates of 4-year programs are awarded with the Bachelor’s Degree (Lisans Diplomasi).

The medium of instruction at some state universities is English, German or French. Therefore, all correspondence with the university staff and applications to the faculties can be done in English, German or French. However, instruction language at state universities is mostly Turkish. When entering the exam of the university, the knowledge of Turkish is not necessary. Those who pass the exams, and have only a little knowledge of Turkish, are considered to take one year of language foundation to gain proficiency in the Turkish language. 

Graduate-level programs consist of master and doctoral programs, coordinated by institutes in universities. Medical specialty programs are carried out within the faculties of medicine and the training hospitals owned by the Ministry of Health and the Social Security Institute (SGK).

Higher Vocational Schools (Meslek Yuksek Okulları): They offer 2 years of undergraduate study after high school and are very much like the community colleges in the USA. The only difference is that students cannot easily transfer to 4-year schools in the USA due to fewer places at the 4-year schools. Two year graduates must take the national Vertical Transfer Test (Dikey Gecis Sinavi) and have a high GPA to be able to apply to 4-year schools. The graduates of 2-year programs are awarded with the Associate’s or Pre-Bachelor’s Degree (On Lisans Diplomasi).

Private or Foundation Universities (Ozel / Vakif Universiteleri): In Turkey, private foundations obtained the right in 1984 to establish and develop universities. They were established with the fundamental aim of creating a centre of excellence in higher education and research. Private universities take more active initiatives to form and to select international and global educational and research networks.

The medium of instruction in most private universities is English. Almost all have one year of English study for those whose level of English is not found to be proficient upon entrance.

Private universities charge tuition fee ranging from USD 6,000-20,000. Although private institutions, they offer considerable financial aid; more than 40% of all students receive some sort of financial aid.

To find out more about Turkish Education system please visit:

http://www.meb.gov.tr/english/indexeng.htmhttp://www.yok.gov.tr/en

Business Opportunities in Turkey

Business Opportunities in Turkey

Establishing a Company
When establishing a company in Turkey, one needs to adhere to the following rules and regulations:

1. Submit the memorandum and articles of association online at MERSIS

Pursuant to the Trade Registry Regulation, trade registration transactions must be fulfilled through MERSIS (Central Registry Record System).

MERSIS is a central information system for carrying out commercial registry processes and storing commercial registry data electronically on a regular basis. A unique number is given to legal entities that are actively involved in business. Online establishment of new companies is possible on MERSIS, and already-established companies may operate through the system after the transfer of their records.

2. Execute and notarize company documents

The following documents are required for registry application at the relevant Trade Registry Office:

  • Articles of incorporation signed by all the founders before Trade Registry Office’s authorized personnel or a Notary Public (four copies, one original)
  • In case the foreign partner is a real person, the required documents are:
    o For each real person shareholder, two copies of their passports
  • In case the foreign partner is a legal entity, the required documents are:
    o The Certificate of Activity of the legal entity designated as the shareholder issued by the relevant authority in the investor’s country. The certificate must bear information regarding the current status and signatories of the company.
    o Resolution(s) of competent corporate organ of legal entity shareholder(s) authorizing the establishment; if there will be any specific condition for the prospective company to be incorporated (name of the company, field of activity, etc.) it must be stated in the resolution for the sake of clarity.
    o In case a legal entity is going to be appointed as a member in the board of directors of the prospective company to be incorporated, the name of the real person who will act in the name of the legal entity and the legal entity board member’s appointment must be stated within the same or with a separate resolution for the sake of clarity. 
    o If the process is going to be followed by proxy, a notarized copy of a power of attorney authorizing the attorneys who will follow up the application before the competent Trade Registry Office and other official authorities in order to proceed with the application (where applicable).
  • Notarized signature declarations (two copies)
  • Notarized identity cards of the company managers (one copy)

It should be noted that, except the first item above, all the necessary documents that will be issued and executed outside Turkey must be notarized and apostilled or alternatively ratified by the Turkish consulate where they are issued. The original executed, notarized, and apostilled documents must be officially translated and notarized by a Turkish notary.

3. Obtain potential tax identity number

The company must obtain potential tax identity numbers for non-Turkish shareholders, and non-Turkish board members of the company from the relevant tax office. This potential tax identity number is necessary for opening a bank account in order to deposit the capital of the company to be incorporated.

The documents required by the tax office are as follows:

  • Petition requesting registration
  • Articles of association (one original)
  • Copy of the tenancy contract showing the registered address for the company
  • If the process is going to be followed by proxy, a power of attorney must be issued specifically showing the authority to act on behalf of the company before the tax authority in order to obtain a tax identity number or potential tax identity number.

4. Deposit a percentage of capital to the account of the Competition Authority 

0.04 percent of the company’s capital must be paid to the account of the Competition Authority via Trade Registry Office pay office.

5. Deposit at least 25 percent of the startup capital in a bank and obtain proof thereof 

25 percent of the subscribed share capital must be paid prior to the new company registration. The remaining 75 percent must be paid within two years. Alternatively, the capital may be fully paid prior to registration.

However, the requirement to pay 25 percent of the capital during establishment before the registration of the company is not applicable to limited companies. Subscribed capital for limited companies may be paid in during the 24 months following the establishment of the company.

6. Apply for registration at the Trade Registry Office 

The founders may apply for registration after gathering the following documents:

  • Petition requesting registration
  • Four copies of incorporation notification form
  • Articles of incorporation signed by all the founders before Trade Registry Office’s authorized personnel or a Notary Public (four copies, one original)
  • Payment made to the bank account of the Competition Authority (0.04 percent of the company’s capital)
  • For each person authorized to represent the founders of the limited liability company, two copies of the signature declarations
  • Founders’ declaration (one original)
  • Chamber of Commerce registration form (two different forms for two different shareholder types: real person shareholder or legal entity shareholder)
  • The written statement of non-shareholder members of board of directors that states acknowledgement of this duty
  • Bank certificate of the paid-in minimum capital deposit (at least 25 percent of subscribed capital). If there will be any capital contribution in kind:
    o The expert report regarding the capital in kind
    o The statement of the relevant registry indicating there is no limitation on that capital in kind
    o The document indicating the annotations have been done to relevant registries regarding the capital in kind
    o The written agreements between founders, other persons, and the founding company regarding the foundation of the company

Following completion of the registration phase before the Trade Registry Office, the Trade Registry Office notifies the relevant tax office and the Social Security Institution ex-officio regarding the incorporation of the company. The Trade Registry Office arranges for an announcement in the Commercial Registry Gazette within approximately 10 days of the company registration. A tax registration certificate must be obtained from the local tax office soon after the Trade Registry Office notifies the local tax office.

A social security number for the company must be obtained from the relevant Social Security Institution. For the employees, a separate application has to be made following the registration of the company with the Social Security Institution.

7. Certify the legal books 

The Trade Registry Office authorized personnel will certify the following books during the establishment process. 

  • Journal
  • Ledger 
  • Inventory book 
  • Share ledger 
  • Manager’s meeting minutes book 
  • General assembly meeting minutes book

8. Follow up with the tax office on the Trade Registry Office’s company establishment notification

The Trade Registry Office notifies the tax office and the Social Security Institution of the company’s incorporation. A tax officer comes to the company headquarters to prepare a determination report. There must be at least one authorized signature in the determination report. Trade Registry Officers send the company establishment form, which includes the tax number notification, to the tax office.

9. Issuance of signature circular

On the day the company is registered at the Trade Registry Office, the signatories of the company must issue a signature circular before the Trade Registry Office authorized personnel.

More at http://www.invest.gov.tr/en-US/investmentguide/investorsguide/Pages/EstablishingABusinessInTR.aspx

Why To Learn Another Language?

Why learn another language?

Here are a few of the best I’ve come across. Speaking a second language will…

1.Open Up a World of Job Opportunities

Learning a second language opens up a ton of career opportunities. I’m not just talking about freelancing or working location-independently either, though these are excellent ideas which I’ve personally used. There are lots of other ways that speaking two or more languages can improve your employment prospects.

The world is changing fast. More companies than ever are doing business in several – often dozens of – countries around the world, but they can’t do it without hiring globally-minded people who can speak at least one foreign language. Ever wanted to be like those people you see in the airport travelling to foreign countries “on business” all the time? That can be you.

Even in small, local companies, chances are that the ability to speak a second language will set you apart from other applicants.

2. Give Your Brain a Boost

Speaking a second language each day really can keep the doctor away! Study after studyhas demonstrated the cognitive benefits of learning another language, no matter how old you are. Memory improvement, longer attention span, and a reduced risk of age-related cognitive decline, are just a few of the known positive effects of speaking two or more languages.

3. Establish Deep Connections and Cross-Cultural Friendships

I’d bet that at least once in your life, you’ve felt a pang of regret during an encounter with someone from a different culture, when you realised how the experience could be enriched by knowing that person’s language.

Has this ever happened to you? You visit a food stall at a local market while on holiday (or even in your own city), where the employees are chatting away together in their native language. You order something, in English, interrupting their fun conversation.

Another local comes by while you’re waiting, orders some food in the local language, and starts talking cheerfully with the cook about…something. A minute later, the cook stops talking and hands you your plate with a simple “Thank you, bye!”

You just missed out on an authentic cultural experience because you couldn’t join in .

Or what about this? You have a friend from another country who you enjoy hanging out with, but you only speak to each other in English. You feel a connection with that person, and think they’re a great friend. And then they mention one day about this other group of friends, who speak their native language, that they meet up with all the time. But you’ve never been invited, because you wouldn’t understand what anyone is saying.

Ok, so you can’t learn every language in the world and have an intimate knowledge of every single culture out there. But if there’s even one culture that you’d like to understand better, or even one person in your life you’d like to know better, then one of the best ways you can start is by learning to speak their language.

4. Get an Outsider’s Perspective about Your Own Culture

Trying to understand your own culture exclusively from within it is like trying to understand what a bus is like if you’ve only ever ridden inside it. You can’t see the bus’s wheels, the exterior colour, or the engine that drives it.

Want the bigger picture? You need to get off that bus and examine it from the outside.

I strongly believe that language and culture are intimately linked. Learn another language and you’ll have insight into another culture. You’ll get to “ride on a different bus” and not only see what it’s like inside and even get comfy in there, but get a clear view of your own for the first time.

Too many people go their entire lives never questioning the universal “truths” they take for granted in their own culture. But step outside this narrow scope, and it’s like stepping out of the Matrix; once your eyes are truly opened to that new perspective, you can never go back.

5. Become More Interesting and Meet More Interesting People

If your first language is English, the second most common language in the world, and yet you’ve made the effort to learn another language rather than expecting the world to accommodate your monolingualism, then you’re a rare breed indeed. This makes you interesting. People will approach you. They’ll want to talk to you. They’ll want to know what motivated you to “bother” learning another language.

Believe me, if you’re a native English speaker who speaks two or more languages, you’ll have many more lively, engaging conversations about a variety of topics than you ever would have had otherwise.

Sure, you could spend your life getting by in English everywhere you go, but that’s boring. Be fun! Be interesting! Be multilingual!

6. Stay Smart in Touristed Areas

There’s always a danger of obvious tourists being targets, or getting hassled by touts, which can ruin your experience of a place where people are actually warm and genuine. The “obvious tourist” tends to be whoever is speaking English, or some other distant tongue.

But everything changes when you use the local language.

I had heard countless stories of how a visit to the Pyramids of Giza is nothing but a frustrating chain of shooing away one tout after another, but by dressing/acting like a local and replying in (my albeit broken) Arabic the entire time, I actually didn’t feel hassled by a single person all the way there. It was actually an experience I’ll never forget!

In over a dozen years travelling the world, I’ve managed to stay sane and stay safe by attempting to blend in as best as I can, as well as responding confidently enough in the local language that potential scammers will believe you’ve been there a while, and they’ll think twice before trying to pull a fast one on you.

7. Become a Better Learner

Every time I learn a new language, I find it easier than the one before. The reasoning is simple: with every new language I study, I figure out ways to learn more efficiently. In other words, I develop language hacks.

Because of my extensive experience with this sort of trial and error, I’ve already identified many common hindrances that I can help you avoid right from the get-go, as well as language hacks that can help you learn faster.

As you spend time learning your first foreign language, you’ll identify your own inefficiencies and eliminate them. You’ll start gaining momentum in your chosen language and learn more and more quickly. Then you’ll be able to hit the ground running with the next language. You’ll be on your way to polyglotism before you know it.

8. Conquer Your Fear of “Looking Stupid”

If a foreigner walked up to you to ask for help with something like directions, and they struggled to find the right English words, and made many mistakes but were obviously trying hard, would you feel like laughing at their effort? I doubt it. You’d more likely be impressed with their courage to walk up to a stranger and speak a language imperfectly. That’s a person who has conquered their fear of making mistakes in front of others, and has managed to communicate with you and gotten help with what they need.

Can’t imagine having that sort of courage yourself? Well, if you decide to learn a language, and you start by speaking from day 1, then you’ll get over your fear very quickly. Not only will you be able to communicate effectively (note that I didn’t say “perfectly”) in a new language, but your confidence will get a huge boost, and you’ll never be held back from trying any new skill. Ever wanted to try dancing? Creative writing? Public speaking? How great would it be to shed your inhibitions and just go for it!

9. Bring Out Your Inner Mr Spock

This may sound surprising, but studies have shown that when you make a decision in your second language, you’re more likely to think logically and avoid basing your decision on emotion. In other words, you’ll become more like Star Trek’s Mr Spock.

There’s no way around it. Humans are emotional creatures. Everyone is guilty of making decisions too hastily and too emotionally. But if you learn to speak another language, you’ll learn to think in that language. And when you think about your decisions in a foreign language, that emotional bias tends to go away and you end up choosing the more logical outcome.

Live long, and prosper!

10. Enjoy Works of Art in their Original Language

Bollywood films, manga, telenovelas, Swah rap – the world is full of non-English works of creative art. Don’t you wish you could appreciate some of them in their original language rather than relying on badly-translated subtitles or English dubs, which lose much of the charm that made the original product popular to begin with?

You may find translations, but you’d be surprised what is lost in translation.

If you’re a fan of any type of foreign media – or you’d like to be, but aren’t interested in experiencing it in English because of all nuances lost in translation – then this is an excellent reason to start learning that new language. You’ll already have a very clear goal in mind, so you’ll know what type of vocabulary will be most useful to learn, and you can use those materials as a study aid as you progress in your new language.

11. No More Paying the Sticker Price

Tired of overpaying for gifts and souvenirs at markets when you go on holiday? It’s common knowledge that at many of these places, there are two prices: one for locals and one for tourists.

Even if you bring your best haggling game to the table, if you try to haggle exclusively in English instead of the local language, you might not get very close to that coveted “local price”. But if you make the effort to learn the local language, then you’ll start the game off with a better hand, and end up saving quite a bit more money than you would have otherwise. And the best part is that you’ll also be participating in an authentic cultural experience in the country you’re visiting.

12. Discover You Can Do It!

As I mentioned earlier, I’ve heard pretty much every excuse that people give for failing to learn a second language. Too old, not enough time, wrong genes. None of them hold water.

Whatever doubts you have, you really can learn another language. You could even hold your first conversation just seven days from now.

So What are You Waiting For?

Everyone has their own unique reasons for wanting to learn another language. But while the reasons may be different, they can all be put into action in the same way: by committing to stop making excuses, and to start speaking the language you’ve always wanted to learn.

Once you’ve held your very first conversation in a foreign language, trust me: you’ll never look back.

Skip to toolbar